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The General Armory

These are the entries in the standard 19th reference book on British arms.

They confirm the common designs seen in the examples.

The only query is the Alne arms say “or” (ie Gold) rather than “ar” (ie Silver). Is this simply a mistake?

See below for some clues to all the weird abbreviations used in such descriptions.

StrangArmory

The terms used to describe the colours in a coat of arms can vary according to source. The basic heraldic colour chart is not quite up to Pantone standards and does leave plenty of scope for interpretation -

Colour

Tincture

Planets

Precious Stones

Old French

Yellow

Or

Sol / Sun

Topaz

Toupace

White

Argent

Luna / Moon

Pearl

Perle

Black

Sable

Saturn

Diamond

Dyamond

Red

Gules

Mars

Ruby

Ruby

Blue

Azure

Jupiter

Sapphire

Saphir

Green

Vert

Venus

Emerald

-

Purple

Purpure

Mercury

Amethyst

Amatiste

Maroon

Sanguine

-

Sardonyx

-

Orange

Tawny /
Tenné

-

Jacinth

-

Gold

Or

-

-

-

Silver

Argent

-

-

-

The first rule of heraldry is the rule of tincture: metal must never be placed upon metal, nor colour upon colour, for the sake of contrast. So, for example, Gold / yellow should not appear on Silver / white. However as coats of arms became purely symbolic (rather than a matter of life or death in battle) this rule was not fully enforced - e.g the arms of the Vatican.

These are some commonly used terms that describe the format of a shield -

Name

Description

Bend

a band running diagonally

Bordure

a border around the edge

Canton

a small square located in an upper corner (normally left)

Chevron

an inverted V central band

Chief

a band across the top of a shield

Cross

a band running centrally top to bottom, another left to right

Fess

a central horizontal band

Pale

a central vertical band

Pile

a V central band

Saltire

a diagonal cross from corner to corner

For more detail (and accuracy) see Wikipedia...

 

As with all these family trees there are likely to be errors and gaps - since few (no?) family trees are ever complete or provide the fully detailed story of something as complex as a family’s history . And it is impossible to wait until all the details are confirmed before publishing what fragments are known about a family tree - since family trees will always have gaps. All the information listed here has been obtained from publicly available sources. Sources put online by both official outlets and through the efforts of amateur researchers. Also note that many of the BMD entries only refer to the Quarter and the Registration District where the event was registered - since these are a main source of the public records.

The latest version of all the family trees is available online at our Webtrees site. Please get in touch with any corrections so that we can be as complete and accurate as possible.

emailme

BrianTownsley Brotherton Grandad.org.uk Northern Heritage Sheeky Family Townsley.info Yorkshire Heritage

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The above book provides much background information about the Fox-Strangways family, their lives and social connections.

 

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